Just study those words and, voila, you’ll get the coveted 800 verbal score. Now he is known for his performances and his ephemeral—sometimes edible—installations.”Source: "Robert Rauschenberg: Ripe for reassessment" published in The Economist, Ethos: noun, the characteristic spirit of a culture, era, or communitySynonyms: character, atmosphere, climate“Mr. The Top 20 Most Common GRE Words . Naipaul: every couple of years or so the dyspeptic writer makes a pronouncement so extreme that it sounds like a plea for attention…”Source: "A bend in the logic" published in The Economist, Ebullient: adjective, Cheerful and full of energySynonyms: exuberant, buoyant, joyful“And in Elon Musk, its ebullient boss, it has a figurehead whose relentless promotion has quickly established Tesla as a luxury brand...”Source: "On a charge" published in The Economist, Edify: verb, Instruct or improve (someone) morally or intellectuallySynonyms: educate, instruct, enlighten“Shows that revolve around women are so few and far between. And unlike every other list you will see, there aren’t 1000 words on the list; just about 100. Which abyss looks darker and deeper?”Source: "The Brexit referendum on June 23rd will be all about David Cameron" published in The Economist, Adept: adjective, Very skilled or proficient at somethingSynonyms: expert, proficient, accomplished“An abundance of clever people—adept in English law as much as in finance—draws in banks, fund managers and so forth...”Source: "From folly to fragmentation" published in The Economist, Agog: adjective, Very eager or curious to hear or see somethingSynonyms: excited, impatient, in suspense“We are now agog to know when, on the basis of its forecasts, the Bank will push up interest rates...”Source: "The perils of planning on the basis of economic forecasts" published in The Economist, Allure: noun, the quality of being powerfully and mysteriously attractive or fascinatingSynonyms: attraction, lure, draw“Yet it was the allure of the Model T for millions of consumers that finally drove the horse off the road.”Source: "When oil is no longer in demand" published in The Economist, Altruism: noun, the belief in or practice of selfless concern for the well-being of othersSynonyms: selflessness, compassion, goodwill“Dr Decety is not the first to wonder, in a scientific way, about the connection between religion and altruism.”Source: "Matthew 22:39" published in The Economist, Ambivalent: adjective, having mixed feelings or contradictory ideas about something or someoneSynonyms: equivocal, uncertain, unsure“The first was a chronic lack of focus. 'You can observe a lot by watching,' means plenty...”Source: "Yogi Berra, linguistic savant" published in The Economist, Misanthropy: noun, a dislike of humankindSynonyms: cynicism, hatred of mankind“[Labour] did not fall into the traps of the old left: confusing individualism for misanthropy...”Source: "The land that Labour forgot" published in The Economist, Monolithic: adjective, large, powerful, and intractably indivisible and uniformSynonyms: inflexible, rigid, unbending“Four things have made Europe a harsher environment for the centre left: its own success, structural change in the economy, a reduced fear of political extremes and the decline of monolithic class groups.”Source: "Rose thou art sick" published in The Economist, Munificent: adjective, Larger or more generous than is usual or necessarySynonyms: bountiful, lavish, handsome“Anyone with a few million dollars to spare can join in. '”Source: "Pandering and other sins" published in The Economist, Gambit: noun, a device, action, or opening remark, typically one entailing a degree of risk, that is calculated to gain an advantageSynonyms: plan, scheme, strategy“What began as a gambit to hold together his divided Tory party is turning into an alarmingly close contest.”Source: "The real danger of Brexit" published in The Economist, Goad: verb, Provoke or annoy (someone) so as to stimulate some action or reactionSynonyms: spur, prod, egg on“Her words were meant to goad officials into action, not (presumably) to describe how she saw the coming four years of her term.”Source: "A series of unfortunate events" published in The Economist, Gouge: verb, Overcharge; swindle“They do not want monopolists to gouge consumers and stifle innovation, yet they often struggle to determine the extent to which such things are happening.”Source: "It’s complicated" published in The Economist, Grandiloquent: adjective, Pompous or extravagant in language, style, or mannerSynonyms: pompous, bombastic, magniloquent“The authors give it a rather grandiloquent name: the desire 'to force destiny, to create serendipity. To that end, we’ve delineated a selection of common vocabulary into three levels of difficulty, so that you ascend in difficulty the more words you learn. show: definitions & notes only words. Most common GRE vocabulary words | GRE vocabulary synonyms and antonyms pdf. The initial awards for physics, for example, were followed by equally munificent prizes in life sciences and mathematics.”Source: "The Breakthrough prizes" published in The Economist, Myopic: adjective, nearsightedSynonyms: short-sighted, insular, small-minded“They are also myopic, judging politicians’ economic management on the basis of only the very recent past.”Source: "X marks the knot" published in The Economist, Nadir: noun, the lowest point in the fortunes of a person or organizationSynonyms: the all-time low, zero“Between its pre-crisis peak in late 2007 and its nadir at the end of 2009, the economy contracted by 11.2%”Source: "Celtic phoenix" published in The Economist, Neophyte: noun, a person who is new to a subject, skill, or beliefSynonyms: beginner, learner, novice“Mr. If you have less than 1 month, then you can start learning words from wordlist such as Barron’s 333, Magoosh word list, Barron’s 800, Manhattan 500. '”Source: "Why the Senate hasn't passed a budget" published in The Economist, Compendium: noun, a collection of concise but detailed information about a particular subjectSynonyms: compilation, anthology“He relies on a crowdsourced compendium of fishermen’s tales.”Source: "Wiki-fishing" published in The Economist, Conscript: verb, Enlist (someone) compulsorilySynonyms: draft, recruit, call up“Most Jewish Israelis are conscripted into the military; about 100,000 new recruits, fresh out of secondary school, are drafted each year...”Source: "Tales from Silicon wadi" published in The Economist, Cosset: verb, Care for and protect in an overindulgent waySynonyms: indulge, pander to“With a big haul, Scotland’s politicians could perhaps afford to cosset oil firms. 251-275. GRE Vocabulary List – 500 Basic Words amortize amorphous amorous amiable amenable ameliorate ambiguous ambience amalgamate allusion allege alchemy aghast aggregate aggravate affectation affable aesthetic advocate adversity adulterate admonish adherent acrid acquiesce abysmal abstain abscond abrasive … Gorsuch also shares Mr. Scalia’s literary talents: he is an elegant writer with a penchant for playful eruditio.”Source: "Donald Trump taps Neil Gorsuch for the Supreme Court" published in The Economist, Pithy: adjective, (of language or style) terse and vigorously expressiveSynonyms: concise, brief, compact“Academics are not known for brevity in writing. published in The Economist, Quell: verb, Suppress (a feeling, especially an unpleasant one)Synonyms: calm, soothe, pacify“So the correct response is to...plump up the capital cushions of its vulnerable banks with enough public money to quell fears of a systemic crisis.”Source: "The Italian job" published in The Economist, Quibble: verb, Argue or raise objections about a trivial matterSynonyms: object to, criticize, nitpick“One can quibble with some of the detail; perhaps the labour market participation rate can rise again, particularly if baby boomers find they don't have enough money with which to retire.”Source: "Nevsky’s prospects: China, fat tails and opaque markets" published in The Economist, Quotidian: adjective, Ordinary or everyday, especially when mundaneSynonyms: day-to-day, average, daily“They are seers, and mystics unfettered by the quotidian, connecting with the divine and reporting back.”Source: "The figure of the mad artistic genius is compelling, but unhelpful" published in The Economist, Recalcitrant: adjective, having an obstinately uncooperative attitude toward authoritySynonyms: uncooperative, intractable“In a move that may test the mettle of recalcitrant Senate Republicans, Barack Obama nominated Merrick Garland, a widely respected and politically moderate judge...”Source: "Barack Obama nominates Merrick Garland to fill Antonin Scalia’s seat" published in The Economist, Recant: verb, Say that one no longer holds an opinion or beliefSynonyms: renounce, disavow, retract“Analysts who predict turmoil are warned to shut up or recant.”Source: "The muzzle grows tighter" published in The Economist, Salient: adjective, Most noticeable or importantSynonyms: conspicuous, noticeable, obvious“The reason for that emphasis may in part be because of the salient threat of terrorism…”Source: "The Democrats’ orchestral finale" published in The Economist, Sardonic: adjective, grimly mocking or cynicalSynonyms: satirical, sarcastic, ironic“Ms Jefferson, it must be said, is a master of the arched-eyebrow, sardonic quip.”Source: "A world apart" published in The Economist, Savant: noun, a learned person, especially a distinguished scientistSynonyms: intellectual, scholar, sage“The more a society treats its businesspeople as hero savants based on their professional successes, elevating them to positions of political power.”Source: "Let them die" published in The Economist, Soliloquy: noun, an act of speaking one’s thoughts aloud when by oneself, especially by a character in a playSynonyms: monologue, speech“Patrick Stewart, for instance, reworked Hamlet’s soliloquy as an ode to the letter B ('B or not a B, that is the question').”Source: "Big Bird, big brain" published in The Economist, Stipulate: verb, Demand or specify (a requirement), typically as part of a bargain or agreementSynonyms: set down, set out, lay down“In trade negotiations, size matters. Study Flashcards On Barron's 300 Absolutely Essential GRE Words at Cram.com. Search. Start studying 500 Most Common GRE Words. If you try your best to recall what the word means before checking the translation, the chances of memorization are much better. on the path to systematic vocabulary improvement. Little can distract a Frenchman from his sacred noonday repast.”Source: "Point me at the SKY" published in The Economist, Ribald: adjective, Referring to sexual matters in an amusingly rude or irreverent waySynonyms: bawdy, indecent, risqué“When challenged... about human rights in Chechnya, he replied with a ribald offer to arrange for the questioner's Islamic circumcision.”Source: "Russia has always had an ambivalent relationship with Islam" published in The Economist, Rococo: adjective, Characterized by an elaborately ornamental late baroque style of decoration‘The building, which once served as the local town hall, boasts rococo wall carvings, a statue of Pallas Athena...”Source: "How foundations linked to Hungary’s central bank used $1 billion" published in The Economist, Sanguine: adjective, Optimistic or positive, especially in an apparently bad or difficult situationSynonyms: hopeful, buoyant, assured“Some fear a future of mass unemployment. Mr. Baker is not the first to notice the anomaly.”Source: "Risk and the stockmarket" published in The Economist, Forage: verb, (of a person or animal) search widely for food or provisionsSynonyms: hunt, scavenge, grub“And you must be ready to abandon tired orthodoxies of the left and right and forage for good ideas across the political spectrum.”Source: "The next supermodel" published in The Economist, Fortuitous: adjective, Happening by a lucky chanceSynonyms: fortunate, advantageous, opportune“Thanks to these sensible policies, and the fortuitous tailwind of higher productivity growth, the economy boomed and prosperity was shared.”Source: "Can she fix it?" Within each group the words are ordered alphabetically. Practice GRE Vocabulary Words Learn with flashcards, games, and more — for free. 'We’re literally talking about life and death. If anyone has any suggestions, please let me know in the course forum! The ones that exist are expected not only to entertain but to represent and edify us too.”Source: "Great expectations" published in The Economist, Egress: noun, the action of going out of or leaving a placeSynonyms: departure, exit, withdrawal“The government must 'protect passenger safety by mandating minimum seat pitch standards to preclude ingress/egress and health issues. Whether you're a student, an educator, or a lifelong learner, Vocabulary.com can put you Full vocabulary lists span thousands of words, with no guarantee that the terms you learn will be the ones you see on test day. It will be expiated on May 26th...”Source: "Rebuilding bridges" published in The Economist, Extant: adjective, still in existence; survivingSynonyms: living, still existing, remaining“The earliest extant painting dates to 1825 and shows him with vivid eyes and thin, sculpted lips.”Source: "Bosom buddies" published in The Economist, Fracas: noun, a noisy disturbance or quarrelSynonyms: scuffle, brawl, affray“By the time the broadcaster took the video off its website a day later, it had caused a diplomatic fracas between Turkey and Germany.”Source: "There once was a prickly sultan" published in The Economist, Frieze: noun, a broad horizontal band of sculpted or painted decoration, especially on a wall near the ceiling“A frieze on the wall of America's Supreme Court shows some of the great law-givers of history, including the Roman emperor Justinian, Moses and Muhammad.”Source: "Shalt or shalt not" published in The Economist, Fusillade: noun, a series of shots fired or missiles thrown all at the same time or in quick successionSynonyms: salvo, volley, bombardment“But thanks to poor communication, many saw it as China’s first fusillade in a global currency war. On the GRE, you are provided with a basic text editor without an auto correction feature. GRE Vocab: How many words should you learn? Technological advances, they say, are ever-less revolutionary...”Source: "Econundrum" published in The Economist, Coda: noun, a concluding event, remark or sectionSynonyms: ending, finale“With distinct ballad, opera and hard rock sections—and a pensive intro and coda, for good measure—the song was not for listeners in a hurry.”Source: "Bohemian Rhapsody's long legacy" published in The Economist, Confound: verb, Prove (a theory, expectation, or prediction) wrongSynonyms: contradict, counter, go against“Yet in another sense, the Fed has confounded predictions—at least, those it made itself.”Source: "The Federal Reserve prepares to raise interest rates again" published in The Economist, Deign: verb, Do something that one considers to be beneath one's dignitySynonyms: come down from one's high horse“If the Senate deigns to consider and confirm a nominee, do not expect changes overnight.”Source: "How the election will shape the Supreme Court" published in The Economist, Disingenuous: adjective, not candid or sincereSynonyms: dishonest, deceitful, duplicitous“But shamelessly self-interested and probably contrary to his real views on the EU though it is, the mayor’s move is perhaps not entirely disingenuous.”Source: "Boris Johnson is wrong: in the 21st century, sovereignty is always relative" published in The Economist, Docile: adjective, Ready to accept control or instruction; submissiveSynonyms: compliant, obedient, pliant“Docile with humans, they are fierce defenders of territory and their young.”Source: "Breeding cows that can defend themselves against jaguars" published in The Economist, Doff: verb, Remove (an item of clothing)Synonyms: lay hold of, take hold of“To don shoes, to doff them, or even to throw them at somebody?”Source: "Putting their best feet forward" published in The Economist, Dote: verb, be extremely and uncritically fond ofSynonyms: adore, love dearly, be devoted to“Falling birth-rates allowed parents to dote on fewer children, who were increasingly likely to go to school.”Source: "Love’s labour" published in The Economist, Endow: verb, Provide with a quality, ability, or assetSynonyms: equip, bless, give“Good and inspiring teachers, meanwhile, such as... J.K. Rowling’s Minerva McGonagall, are portrayed as endowed with supernatural gifts...”Source: "Teaching the teachers" published in The Economist, Ephemeral: adjective, Lasting for a very short timeSynonyms: fleeting, passing, short-lived“One was Song Dong, just 19 and studying oil painting which he quickly abandoned. Don't have an account yet? published in The Economist, Lugubrious: adjective, Looking or sounding sad and dismalSynonyms: mournful, gloomy, sad“The lugubrious strains of 'Heaven Knows I’m Miserable Now' waft across a sunny beach in Acapulco.”Source: "Girlfriend in a conga" published in The Economist, Maelstrom: noun, a situation or state of confused movement or violent turmoilSynonyms: turbulence, tumult, turmoil“The execution of its leaders, as much as the Easter Rising itself, triggered a maelstrom of events: a surge of anti-British rage...”Source: "A terrible problem is born" published in The Economist, Magnate: noun, a wealthy and influential businessman or businesswomanSynonyms: industrialist, tycoon, mogul“Several of America’s great industrialists built empires in Pittsburgh, including Andrew Carnegie, a steel magnate. published in The Economist, Treacherous: adjective, Guilty of or involving betrayal or deceptionSynonyms: traitorous, disloyal, perfidious“It sang of domineering men, treacherous women and the manly solace of tequila.”Source: "Mexico’s mirror" published in The Economist, Vapid: adjective, offering nothing that is stimulating or challenging; blandSynonyms: insipid, uninspired, uninteresting“Mr. published in The Economist, Extol: verb, Praise enthusiasticallySynonyms: go wild about, wax lyrical about“This is likely to become a media circus, with patient advocates likely to attend and extol the benefits of the treatments they received.”Source: "A dish called hope" published in The Economist, Façade: noun, the face of a buildingSynonyms: front, frontage, exterior“Its grey stone façade and arched doorways convey a feeling of prosperity, a splash of high finance in this small county town in eastern China...”Source: "Big but brittle" published in The Economist, Fetid: adjective, smelling extremely unpleasantSynonyms: stinking, smelly, foul-smelling“The fetid smog that settled on Beijing in January 2013 could join the ranks of these game-changing environmental disruptions.”Source: "The East is grey" published in The Economist, Florid: adjective, using unusual words or complicated rhetorical constructionsSynonyms: extravagant, grandiloquent“A victorious Governor Jerry Brown, his voice gruffer, his pate sparer and his metaphors more florid than during his first stint in office...”Source: "Brownian motion" published in The Economist, Flout: verb, Openly disregardSynonyms: defy, refuse to obey, go against“It relies on its members, and on institutions... to shame and discourage people who flout important political norms.”Source: "How strong are the institutions of liberal societies?" These 1800 words are split into 14 Word Lists. Okay, I know, every list purports to be the Top 10 or 20 GRE words. It churns out turgid propaganda about repaired bridges and newly opened schools.”Source: "Fighting near and far" published in The Economist, Tyro: noun, a beginner or noviceSynonyms: learner, neophyte, newcomer“When he was a young tyro in Silicon Valley, his libertarian vision inspired many of his business decisions.”Source: "The evolution of Mr. Thiel" published in The Economist, Umbrage: noun, Offense or annoyanceSynonyms: insult, affront“Petro Poroshenko, Ukraine’s president, takes umbrage at charges that reforms are lagging.”Source: "Commitment anxiety" published in The Economist, Upbraid: verb, Find fault with (someone)Synonyms: scold, reprimand, rebuke“In the past its neighbours isolated and upbraided Austria for its flirtations with nationalist extremism...”Source: "Why Austria’s presidential election matters" published in The Economist, Verdant: adjective, (of countryside) green with grass or other rich vegetationSynonyms: leafy, grassy, lush“The Holey Artisan Bakery... overlooking a placid lake in Dhaka, was a foodie’s labour of love in a verdant corner of the chaotic capital.”Source: "The new terrorism in Bangladesh" published in The Economist, Virulent: adjective, extremely severe or harmful in its effectsSynonyms: toxic, deadly, destructive‘A more likely catastrophe, Mr. Rawles believes, would be a pandemic virulent enough to cause the breakdown of the national sewerage system as well as the grid.”Source: "The last big frontier" published in The Economist, Vitiate: verb, Destroy or impair the legal validity ofSynonyms: put an end to, do away with, scrap‘The firm admitted that it vitiated its stated standards for evaluating securities in an area where those standards put in question its ability to win business.”Source: "Regulatory settlements raise questions about America’s financial markets" published in The Economist, Vitriol: noun, Cruel and bitter criticismSynonyms: venom, nastiness“Given the vitriol that has followed the film since its inception, it does well simply not to be a colossal misstep.”Source: "Ghostbusters: funny and (almost) feminist" published in The Economist, Vociferous: adjective, (Especially of a person or speech) vehement or clamorousSynonyms: blatant, clamorous, noisy“Ten weeks of ever-more vociferous argument, claims and counterclaims stretch between now and June 23rd, when the vote will take place.”Source: "Britain’s EU referendum campaigns are officially launched today" published in The Economist, Welter: noun, a large number of items in no order; a confused massSynonyms: confusion, jumble, tangle“At the same time they are subjected to a welter of conflicting pressures—acting as spin-doctors and bean-counters as well as corporate strategists and auditors.”Source: "The imperial CFO" published in The Economist, Winnow: verb, blow a current of air through (grain) in order to remove the chaffSynonyms: sift out, filter out“Many lawmakers from both parties join Mr. Obama in wishing to winnow America’s overstuffed prisons.”Source: "How Barack Obama has reformed America’s prisons" published in The Economist, Xenophobia: noun, Intense or irrational dislike or fear of people from other countries“Denk will not win more than a few seats in next year’s general election, but it is posing a crucial question: at a time of rising xenophobia, can Europe’s minorities rely on the broad centre-left parties for which they usually vote?”Source: "The politics of alienation" published in The Economist, Yoke: noun, a wooden crosspiece that is fastened over the necks of two animals and attached to the plow or cart that they are to pullSynonyms: bond, tie, subjection“The existential consequences of throwing off the yoke of religion is debated in many countries.”Source: "Getting into Valhalla" published in The Economist. Created by. We have collated approximately 1800 words that appear most frequently in the GRE. For most words, full definitions are not given; rather, synonyms are used. For many GRE test-takers, vocabulary-building presents a special challenge. Each of the 15 wordlists contains 100 important words. Cram.com makes it easy to get the grade you want! Below are ten difficult GRE words: this is the level of vocabulary you can expect to see on the most difficult of the verbal sections. published in The Economist, Fringe: noun, the unconventional, extreme, or marginal wing of a group or sphere of activitySynonyms: peripheral, radical, unorthodox“Fringe beliefs reinforced in these ways can establish themselves and persist long after outsiders deem them debunked...”Source: "Yes, I’d lie to you" published in The Economist, Garner: verb, Gather or collect (something, especially information or approval)Synonyms: accumulate, amass, assemble“Labs that garnered more pay-offs were more likely to pass on their methods to other, newer labs...”Source: "Incentive malus" published in The Economist, Gist: noun, the substance or essence of a speech or textSynonyms: quintessence, main idea“Machine translation, too, has gone from terrible to usable for getting the gist of a text...”Source: "Finding a voice" published in The Economist, Gossamer: adjective, Used to refer to something very light, thin, and insubstantial or delicateSynonyms: gauzy, gossamery, fine“Like a saintly relic, the gossamer threads that tie the two halves offer the promise of miraculous healing by evoking the vulnerability of the suffering body.”Source: "Die and do" published in The Economist, Grovel: verb, Act in an obsequious manner in order to obtain someone's forgiveness or favorSynonyms: be servile, suck up, flatter“She writes...in the knowledge that some of these lovers will snoop into her diary to see what she's written. '”Source: "Pushback" published in The Economist, Vestige: noun, a trace of something that is disappearing or no longer existsSynonyms: remnant, remainder, fragment“He said this would remove a 'lingering vestige of the cold war.' GRE Word Lists. abase. GRE words can make a real difference in your Verbal score: studying our GRE word list of these 357 essential GRE vocab words will help you be fully prepared for success on the test! So here are 100 words along with their synonyms to use for your GRE (and potentially other standardized tests) preparation. give up, such as power, as of monarchs and emperors, formally reject or disavow a formerly held belief, run away, often taking something or somebody along, refrain from doing, consuming, or partaking in something, an increase by natural growth or addition, make impure by adding a foreign or inferior substance, a person who pleads for a person, cause, or idea, the lofty nest of a bird of prey, such as a hawk or eagle, characterized by an appreciation of beauty or good taste, embellish; increase the scope, power, or importance of, bring or combine together or with something else, pay off a debt or obligation by making periodic payments, a trinket thought to be a magical protection against evil, locating something at a time when it couldn't have existed, absence of the sense of pain without loss of consciousness, deviation from the normal or common order, form, or rule, not faithful to religion or party or cause, based on or subject to individual discretion or preference, act between parties with a view to reconciling differences, so extremely old as seeming to belong to an earlier period, become weaker, in strength, value, or magnitude, an event indicating important things to come, a proposition that is not susceptible of proof or disproof, repeated too often; overfamiliar through overuse, cheat somebody out of what is due, especially money, any plant disease resulting in withering without rotting, a disposition to be friendly and approachable, a crude uncouth ill-bred person lacking refinement, a clique that seeks power usually through intrigue, openly straightforward and direct without secretiveness, determined by chance or impulse rather than by necessity, substance that initiates or accelerates a chemical reaction, comprehensive or broad-minded in tastes and interests, capable of destroying or eating away by chemical action, formless state of matter before the creation of the cosmos, a person with a prejudiced belief in his own superiority, careful to consider potential consequences and avoid risk, feeling or expressing pain or sorrow for sins or offenses, willfully obstinate; stubbornly disobedient, an exclusive circle of people with a common purpose, lacking even the rudiments of courage; abjectly fearful, an irascible, cantankerous person full of stubborn ideas, a young woman making her formal entrance into society, characterized by propriety and dignity and good taste, a leader who seeks support by appealing to popular passions, marked by lack of definite plan, purpose, or enthusiasm, an amateur engaging in an activity without serious intention, a song or hymn of mourning as a memorial to a dead person, fundamentally different or distinct in quality or kind, a stick on which wool or flax is wound before spinning, cause to expand as if by internal pressure, having a daily cycle or occurring every day, a clergyman or other person in religious orders, a stubborn person of arbitrary or arrogant opinions, a doctrine or code of beliefs accepted as authoritative, pertaining to a code of beliefs accepted as authoritative, selecting what seems best of various styles or ideas, capacity or power to produce a desired result, audacious behavior that you have no right to, expressing yourself readily, clearly, effectively, make more attractive, as by adding ornament or color, strive to equal or match, especially by imitating, native to or confined to a certain region, something that baffles understanding and cannot be explained, anything short-lived, as an insect that lives only for a day, a person devoted to refined sensuous enjoyment, an artificial or inferior substitute or imitation, understandable only by an enlightened inner circle, the distinctive spirit of a culture or an era, a formal expression of praise for someone who has died, an inoffensive expression substituted for an offensive one, precisely and clearly expressed or readily observable, notation of how many times to multiply a quantity by itself, edit by omitting or modifying parts considered indelicate, left unplowed and unseeded during a growing season, marked by excessive enthusiasm for a cause or idea, capable of producing offspring or vegetation, a rectangular piece of cloth of distinctive design, keep from happening or arising; make impossible, fast and energetic in an uncontrolled or wild way, the period during which an embryo develops, look angry or sullen as if to signal disapproval, temperamentally seeking and enjoying the company of others, shrewdness as demonstrated by being skilled in deception, the dominance or leadership of one social group over others, consisting of elements not of the same kind or nature, all of the same or similar kind or nature, someone who attacks cherished ideas or institutions, a behavioral attribute peculiar to an individual, a situation in which no progress can be made, not having enough money to pay for necessities, not admitting of passage or capable of being affected, characterized by undue haste and lack of thought, the act of calling down a curse that invokes evil, only partly in existence; imperfectly formed, teach and impress by frequent repetitions or admonitions, gain favor with somebody by deliberate efforts, not injurious to physical or mental health, an investigation into the cause of an unexpected death, lacking interest or significance or impact, the time between two reigns or governments, impervious to pleas, persuasion, requests, or reason, fill or cover completely, usually with water, abusive language used to express blame or censure, the ceremonial promotion of a person to an office or rank, containing or implying a slight or showing prejudice, technical terminology characteristic of a particular subject, marked by the exercise of common sense in practical matters, the shape or manner in which things come together, relating to the motion of material bodies and their forces, the sound of a bell rung slowly to announce a death, an expression of approval and commendation, relating to precious stones or the art of working with them, the act of taking something from someone unlawfully, potentially existing but not presently evident or realized, openly distrustful and unwilling to confide, showing or characterized by broad-mindedness, transparently clear; easily understandable, the wood of trees prepared for use as building material, a crafty and involved plot to achieve your ends, a very wealthy or powerful businessperson, someone who demands exact conformity to rules and forms, a figure of speech that suggests a non-literal similarity, marked by precise accordance with details, have force or influence; bring about an effect or change, a written message addressed to a person or organization, lessen or to try to lessen the seriousness or extent of, of communal life sequestered under religious vows, the quality of wearisome constancy and lack of variety, the conventions embodying the fundamental values of a group, marked by or showing unaffected simplicity, plant having stinging hairs that cause skin irritation, relating to or constituting or bearing or giving a name, a subtle difference in meaning or opinion or attitude, the collection and study of money (and coins in particular), slanting or inclined in direction or course or position, attempting to win favor from influential people by flattery, marked by tenacious unwillingness to yield, intrusive in a meddling or offensive manner, not transmitting or reflecting light or radiant energy, express one's view openly and without fear or hesitation, relating to or being a large and stately residence, deficient in color suggesting physical or emotional distress, a person who is rejected from society or home, a work of art that imitates the style of some previous work, a person who pays too much attention to formal rules, a state of extreme poverty or destitution, travel around, through, or over, especially on foot, hasty and without attention to detail; not thorough, mentally acute or penetratingly discerning, the act of donating money or time to promote human welfare, a person who is uninterested in intellectual pursuits, synthetic material that can be molded into objects, of or associated with the great masses of people, a verbal or written attack, especially of a belief or dogma, marked by artful prudence, expedience, and shrewdness, a person who speaks more than one language, take as a given; assume as a postulate or axiom, a powerful ruler, especially one who is unconstrained by law, speak about unimportant matters rapidly and incessantly, a sketchy summary of the main points of an argument, perceiving the significance of events before they occur, displaying or suggesting a lack of maturity, strong and sharp to the sense of taste or smell, lacking in courage, strength, and resolution, filled to satisfaction with food or drink, refuse to acknowledge, ratify, or recognize as valid, study of the technique for using language effectively, having excessive asymmetrical ornamentation, treated as if holy and kept free from violation or criticism, an illegal action inciting resistance to lawful authority, endowed with feeling and unstructured consciousness, unsparing and uncompromising in discipline or judgment, inactivity resulting from a balance between opposing forces, having or revealing little emotion or sensibility, an elaborate or deceitful scheme to deceive or evade, take the place or move into the position of, unfriendly and inclined toward anger or irritation, a person addicted to luxury and pleasures of the senses, a person who tries to please someone to gain an advantage, the relation between two interdependent species of organisms, a musical rhythm accenting a normally weak beat, implied by or inferred from actions or statements, a sharp hooked claw especially on a bird of prey, of or relating to or characteristic of the planet Earth, having keenness and forcefulness and penetration in thought, a feeling of anger caused by being offended, greatly exceeding bounds of reason or moderation, admitting of no doubt or misunderstanding, the act of lending money at an exorbitant rate of interest, regard with feelings of respect and reverence, characterized by abundance of vegetation and green foliage, an indication that something has been present, having a relatively high resistance to flow, liable to lead to sudden change or violence, pause or hold back in uncertainty or unwillingness, lean and wrinkled by shrinkage as from age or illness, a ghostly figure, especially one seen shortly before death, a wooden frame across the shoulders for carrying buckets, a fervent and even militant proponent of something, the point above the observer directly opposite the nadir, Created on June 23, 2013 You’Ll get the grade you want become less in … Start studying 500 most GRE. 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